Author Topic: My Zoltar Bracket machine  (Read 7692 times)

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rikvancoolwijk

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My Zoltar Bracket machine
« on: February 12, 2012, 06:23:58 PM »
Hi,

Since a few months I own a zoltar bracket machine.
We (me and my uncle) bought it second hand from Chris.

We now have it up and running, it is working with a home made power supply, stepperdrivers and we've made an usbcnc controller to connect everything to the computer.

This is the power supply and the stepperdrivers. The power supply is a bit bigger than it should be, because it was made with an hf spindle in mind. For now we are using a Kress in stead.

As you can see we didn't put any effort in making it pretty yet.  ;D  :-X


Here is the machine making doing its first "real" work.


And a close-up.


This is my little hobby room, most of the time it’s a real mess! But hey the stuff that comes out is very nice.


Together with my uncle I'm making speakers and amplifiers. With the CNC machine we want to make new and beautiful audio equipment.


This is one of the amplifiers we make.


I'm still learning to work with the machine but its going better each day.

Rik
« Last Edit: February 13, 2012, 12:28:23 PM by rikvancoolwijk »

Chris@home

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Zoltar Bracket machine
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2012, 08:40:56 PM »
Nice start!

Looking forward to see how this box is processed further.

-chris-

(can you turn the pics 90degrees?)

rikvancoolwijk

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Re: My Zoltar Bracket machine
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2012, 06:30:27 PM »
Something about our home and limit switches, it is still in a experimental state but it is working like a charm. We are using simple dipolar hall sensors on the moving parts of the x,y and z-axis and the magnets are installed on the rotating ball screws.

This is the underside of the z-ax, you can see the hall sensor. The magnet is on the backside of the mdf disc installed on the underside of the ball screw. This way the limit switch is very accurate, even with very high speed it works with an accuracy of >0.1mm


Same idea with the top of the z-ax, you can see the small magnet on the ball screw coupling.


Hall sensor for the y-ax homing.

Next step is to marry two hall sensors together per side, one as a proximity sensor and one as a switch, for extra accuracy . Or maybe not better accuracy but a more gentle stop. the best thing about this sensors is that you get hi accuracy home and limit switches for under €10,- for all 6 sides.

Last step of course is making a easy and elegant way to install the sensors but for now the circuit board fixing is working very well.

Rik
« Last Edit: February 13, 2012, 08:20:49 PM by rikvancoolwijk »

Chris@home

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Re: My Zoltar Bracket machine
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2012, 11:02:20 AM »
Hey Rik,

Thats a good idea, but seems to me a bit vulnerable with the PCB hanging out there.
Cant we use that on our 3D printer later-on?

-chris-

rikvancoolwijk

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Re: My Zoltar Bracket machine
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2012, 11:22:45 AM »
The pcb’s are placed in a way that you’d have to do strange things to let anything touch them. And they are attached with double sided sticky tape. Of course there is room for improvement.

If we take this kind of hall sensors into account when designing the 3d printer we can come to a much more elegant solution :), we can definitely use them for the printer! Maybe some of the axis of the 3d printer need a different approach, but we'll make it work ;D

Rik